FAQ Topics
    The answers presented here are not intended to supersede the information included in the current Report Card Manual which can be downloaded from http://www.ode.state.or.us/search/page/?=24. They should, instead, be considered supplementary. Any apparent discrepancies between the content here and that found in the Report Card Manuals should be reported to Jon Wiens eMail.

    What are the report cards?
    In 1999 the Oregon Legislature enacted ORS 329.105 requiring that the Oregon Department of Education produce and issue annual report cards for all schools and districts. This law codified the desire of the public for consistent and reliable information about schools. Oregon SB 811 (in 2001) mandated additional requirements for the school and district report cards. In January 2002, Federal HR 1 “No Child Left Behind” legislated specific requirements for schools and districts that led to changes in 2003-2004 and subsequent report cards. Oregon HB 2263 (in 2007) made additional changes to the requirements for the school and district report cards.

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    How do I get a copy of the new school and district report cards?
    You can access a copy of any of the school or district report cards on the Oregon Department of Education website at: http://www.ode.state.or.us/data/reportcard/reports.aspx.

    Keywords: Report Card Redesign Appears in topics: Report Card

    What is the purpose of the report cards?
    The school report card is one of several programs initiated to improve education throughout Oregon by providing an opportunity to communicate and celebrate the many good things that are happening in schools. The report card may assist in initiating discussions about areas targeted for improvement. Demonstrating that schools are accountable, the report card displays consistent and reliable information about each school and district directly to parents and community members.

    Keywords: Appears in topics: Report Card

    Who will receive the school report card?
    All schools in Oregon that meet the definition of a public school and have resident students will be included in the Oregon report card system. These report cards are to be distributed to every parent with a child enrolled in a public school in the state.

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    Do the new report cards provide a rating for schools?
    Yes, the new report cards provide two overall school ratings. One rating compares the school to all others in the state. The other rating compares the school to other schools with similar student demographics.

    Keywords: Report Card Redesign Appears in topics: Report Card

    How are schools rated?
    The ratings are based on the new accountability system that Oregon developed as part of the federal flexibility waiver. The new system has a much greater focus on student learning and growth and uses multiple measures to rate schools. For high schools these measures include academic achievement, academic growth, subgroup growth, graduation rates, and subgroup graduation. For elementary and middle schools the first three measures are used. Schools receive an overall rating of Level 1 through 5 based on how well they are doing in each of these areas.

    The rating that compares a school to other schools with similar student demographics provides parents and community members with another perspective on achievement at the school. The rating is based on a comparison that takes into account the school's percent poverty, mobility, students of color, and English learners. Schools are rated as below average, about average, or above average as compared to other schools that share these similar student demographics.

    Keywords: Report Card Redesign Appears in topics: Report Card

    What do the school ratings of Level 1 through 5 mean?
    Schools receive an overall rating of Level 1 through 5 based on their students' growth, performance, and outcomes. Level 1 schools represent the bottom 5% of schools. Level 2 schools represent the next lowest 10%. Level 3 makes up the next 30% of schools. Level 4 represents the largest share of schools, those that fall between 44% and 90% of schools. Level 5 represents the top 10%.

    Keywords: Report Card Redesign Appears in topics: Report Card

    Do districts receive report card ratings?
    No, districts do not receive ratings in the Oregon report card system. District report cards contain district-wide statistics and additional data elements.

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    How do the new report cards differ from the old ones?
    The most immediately recognizable difference between the report cards is that, for the first time, the reports are in color. Additional new features include: a letter from the principal/superintendent, an enhanced school/district profile with demographic charts, information on the curriculum and learning environment, and, at the high school level, additional outcome data including a five-year completer rate, percent of freshmen on track to graduate, and percent of students going on to college.

    Keywords: Report Card Redesign Appears in topics: Report Card

    Why have the report cards been redesigned?
    The school and district report cards have been redesigned to reflect changes to Oregon's educational system so that parents and community members are provided with the most current, relevant, and important information about their school and districts. The new report cards allow schools and districts to better tell their unique stories in a more visual and user-friendly way.

    Keywords: Report Card Redesign Appears in topics: Report Card

    Who decided what changes to make to the report cards?
    The redesign of the school and district report cards is the result of a broad-based effort which gathered feedback from parents, community members, educators, and stakeholders from around the state. Last fall, a 17-member Report Card Steering Committee was convened to make recommendations on the design, content, and rating methodology of the new report cards. This committee gathered feedback on the redesign from over 130 parents, teachers, and administrators around the state via in-person focus groups. Additionally, online surveys generated over 2,000 responses from around the state. The Report Card Steering Committee used this feedback to inform their recommendation on changes to the key elements, layout, and focus of the report cards. The final recommendations were adopted by the State Board of Education this spring.

    Keywords: Report Card Redesign Appears in topics: Report Card

    Where does the data used in the new report cards come from?
    Data for these report cards come from a variety of sources. The achievement data come from state testing results. Graduation and outcome data is provided to the state by districts as part of annual data collections. Student demographic data is collected as part of the annual student enrollment collections. Some of the new elements of the report cards are submitted specifically for this report including the superintendent/principal letter, the freshman on track data, and the information on curriculum and learning environment.

    Keywords: Report Card Redesign Appears in topics: Report Card

    Why is some of the data in the report cards different from other data on the Oregon Department of Education website?
    There are two main differences you might notice between data on the report cards and previously published data. The test results published in September include data from all students enrolled on the first school day in May (regardless of how long they have been in the school). The report cards, since they are an accountability measure, only include test results for studentswho have been enrolled in the school for at least half of the school year since these are the students for whom the school had the greatest opportunity to impact learning. Another difference is in the English Learner (EL) category. In the report cards, we report on all students who were ever identified as English Learners rather than just those currently or recently receiving services. This gives schools credit for the learning and growth of their formerly EL students. This differs from other ODE reports.

    Keywords: Report Card Redesign Appears in topics: Report Card

    What do blank sections on the report card mean?
    Many sections of the report cards are filled from data collected throughout the year as part of regular data collections. However, districts were required to submit some additional pieces of information for this report (letter, curriculum info, etc.). This information was required to be submitted in both English and Spanish. If the information was not submitted, or was not submitted in both languages, those sections were left blank on the report card.

    Keywords: Report Card Redesign Appears in topics: Report Card

    Will each school and district in the state distribute a report card?
    Yes. Each school and district in the state is required to provide parents or guardians with a copy of their report card. Districts must distribute these report cards by January 15. These report cards can be distributed in either a hard copy or electronic format.

    Keywords: Report Card Redesign Appears in topics: Report Card

    When must Report Cards be sent to parents?
    The 2013-14 school and district report cards were publicly released on October 9, 2014. Under OAR 581-022-1060, by January 15, 2015 school districts must make a copy of the state provided school and district report card available to the parent(s) or guardian(s) of each child enrolled in a public school in the school district by doing one or more of the following:
    • Mailing a copy;
    • Electronically sending a copy; or
    • Providing a link to a state or district web site containing the reports and also making copies available in local schools, libraries, parent centers, community centers, or other public locations easily accessible to parents and others.
    English and Spanish versions of the report cards are posted at http://www.ode.state.or.us/data/reportcard/reports.aspx.

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    How do we know that the information in the Report Card is accurate?
    District staff are given an opportunity to review and to correct the information they submit describing their students and schools. Tests are scored by professionals outside the Oregon Department of Education skilled in this type of work, and the results are thoroughly validated.

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    What types of tests are included in determining Report Card performance ratings?
    The highest test score from a standard test administration at or above grade level (with or without accommodations) from students (except for first year Limited English Proficient (LEP) students) enrolled in a district on the first school day in May for a full academic year are included in the Report Card student performance data. Modified and targeted down assessments are considered nonstandard administrations and are not included in Report Card performance calculations. Extended assessments are included in performance data.

    Keywords: Performance, Full academic year Appears in topics: Report Card

    How are the scores of students who meet the state’s alternate standards on an Extended Assessment included in the percentage of students meeting standard?
    For state assessment reports, the Extended Assessment scores are counted as not meeting standards.

    For school and district Report Cards, up to 1% of the tests in a district used to calculate participation rates may be from students that meet the state’s alternate standards. If the percentage of tests that meet the alternate standards in a district exceeds 1%, the district must identify which tests are to be counted as not meeting standard for the Report Card. Additional information about Extended Subject Area Assessments is on the web at http://www.ode.state.or.us/search/results/?id=178.

    Keywords: Extended Assessment, Test Scores, Performance, Special Education Appears in topics: Report Card

    When do students have to be enrolled in the school to be included in participation rates for schools and districts?
    Students enrolled on the first school day in May and during the testing window who do not participate in the state assessment are counted as non-participants. Students who are enrolled on the first school day in May and were not enrolled during the testing window or who arrived so late in the school’s test window that a test cannot be completed can be excused from participation at the district’s discretion.

    Keywords: Resident School, Participation Appears in topics: Report Card

    Which students must schools include in state assessments?
    All students for whom public funds are expended on instruction are expected to participate in all required state assessments. This includes registered home schooled students, privately schooled students, tuitioned students, and any other students exempted from compulsory school attendance, attending public schools or programs part time, and receiving instruction provided by the district in the state content standards during the school year.

    Keywords: Resident School, Participation, Who to report Appears in topics: Report Card

    Are students with limited English proficiency included on the report card?
    Yes, those students who are able to participate in the state mathematics assessments in Spanish or English are included in student Participation. These scores are also included in student Performance with the exception of beginning LEP students (those who enrolled in a U.S. school for the first time after May 1 of the prior school year). Eligible students who participate in the writing assessment by responding in Spanish are also included.

    2013-14 Oregon Statewide Assessments for English Language Learners
    Reading/Literature

    Spanish Grade 3: An optional assessment. The 2013-14 assessments will count toward the Report Card.

    Math Knowledge and Skills
    Spanish/English Side-by-Side: Included in Performance and Participation.
    Russian/English Side-by-Side: Included in Performance and Participation.

    Writing
    Responses in English included in Performance and Participation.
    Responses in Spanish are included in Performance and Participation for students whose English Language proficiency is not adequate to yield reliable results in English, and who have been classified as an English Language Learner for five years or less.

    Keywords: Participation, LEP Students, Writing Appears in topics: Report Card

    Students take benchmark tests that do not correspond with their grade levels. Are these scores included in the report card calculations?
    It depends. Students targeting up are counted as participants and as meeting standard if they meet the achievement/performance standard for the test. There is an exception to this rule: an 8th grade student who targets up to the high school test is not counted as participating unless the student takes the test for 8th grade as well. The score from the 8th grade test is included in the report card while a passing score on the high school test is included in the report card when the student is enrolled in grade 11. Students targeting down are not counted in participation or performance.

    Keywords: Target Appears in topics: Report Card

    How will students of non-consenting parents be included on the report card?
    Students whose parents provide a written refusal of consent on the basis of religious or IEP disability related reasons, as provided for in OAR 581-022-1910, will be included as non-participants in the calculation of participation rates.

    Keywords: Participation Appears in topics: Report Card

    How are the scores reported for 12th grade students taking the Grade 11 assessments?
    Students in Grade 12 who are taking the Grade 11 test will not be reported either in participation or student performance. Only the scores of students who are in benchmark grades are included in participation and student performance.

    Keywords: Participation, Performance Appears in topics: Report Card

    How are the scores reported for 9th and 10th grade students taking the Grade 11 assessments?
    Students in 9th or 10th grade may elect to take the Grade 11 assessment. Scores meeting or exceeding the standard will be held until the student is in Grade 11. If the student retests in Grade 11, the highest of all scores the student earns will be reported.

    Keywords: Participation, Performance Appears in topics: Report Card

    How are the scores reported for 8th grade students taking the Grade 11 assessments?
    Students in advanced coursework who are in 8th grade may elect to take the Grade 11 assessment. Scores meeting or exceeding the standard will be held until the student is in Grade 11. If the student retests in 9th, 10th or 11th grades, the highest score the student earns will be reported. To be counted as participants in the report card for the current year, an 8th grade student must take the 8th grade test. The score from the 8th grade test is included in student performance calculations.

    Keywords: Participation, Performance, Target Appears in topics: Report Card

    Are science results included in the report card this year?
    Science participation and performance for 2013-14 is displayed on page 2 of the School Report Card. Science participation rates are no longer included in the school rating formula.

    Keywords: Participation, Performance, Science Appears in topics: Report Card

    Where will the assessment scores be reported for students in alternative programs?
    Student scores will be associated with the resident school on the first school day in May, as identified in the Third Period Cumulative ADM collection.

    Keywords: Resident School, Participation, Alternative schools Appears in topics: Report Card

    What is meant by the phrase “for display only”?
    Many data elements are shown on the report card for informational purposes only with no ratings attached to the data. The purpose of the displays is to give more information to individuals interested in school performance.

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    What accounts for the different participation and performance rates reported on school and district report cards?
    The participation rate on page 2 of the Report Card combines the participation rates for reading, mathematics, science, and writing assessments.

    The report card rating calculation and the achievement data on page 2 includes only students who were enrolled at the school for at least half of the school year. In addition, students who meet or exceed on Extended Assessments will (up to the 1% cap) count as a meets or exceeds in the achievement rating.

    Keywords: Extended Assessment, Participation, Performance, Writing, Special Education, Science, Full academic year Appears in topics: Report Card

    Where can I get more information about what makes a "Highly Qualified" teacher?
    We have information specific to highly qualified teachers online at http://www.ode.state.or.us/search/page/?id=2219.

    Keywords: Highly qualified teachers Appears in topics: Report Card

    Is there a document that compares schools’ scores to other schools in the state?

    The Comparison Schools and Comparison Districts lists, along with explanatory documentation, are available on the Report Card Tools webpage.

    Keywords: Comparison schools Appears in topics: Report Card, Assessment Reports

    Where can I find more information about state assessments?
    More details about the Oregon Statewide Assessment System can be found on the Testing - Student Assessment webpage at http://www.ode.state.or.us/search/results/?id=169.

    Keywords: Testing - Assessment Appears in topics: AYP, Report Card

    How do we change the Superintendent/Principal on our Report Card?
    The Institution Validation in the Spring is intended as a validation for institution information (e.g. Superintendent/Principal name) for the report card that is published the following Fall. Please be sure you are checking this validation in the Achievement Data Insight for information that will appear on your report card.

    To submit name changes, please use Appendix A of the Institution Request Form, which can be found online at http://www.ode.state.or.us/search/results/?id=219. It is not necessary to return the entire Request Form. Complete Appendix A and send only this page to ode.institutions-request@ode.state.or.us eMail or fax it to 503-378-5156 attn. Institution Changes. These changes are accepted throughout the school year but must be received by September 15 to be included in the report card.
    Keywords: Report Card, institution , request , form , institution change, appendix A Appears in topics: Report Card, Institutions

    How do I change a school name or other information on my report card?
    The Institution Validation in the Spring is intended as a validation for institution information (e.g. which institutions are in your district) for the report card that is published the following Fall. Please be sure you are checking this validation in the Achievement Data Insight for information that will appear on your report card.

    To submit name changes, please use the Institution Request Form, which can be found online at http://www.ode.state.or.us/search/results/?id=219. Email this form and supporting documentation to ode.institutions-request@ode.state.or.us eMail or fax it to 503-378-5156 attn. Institution Changes.

    ODE requests that changes to the Institution Validation be submitted during the Validation Window in the Spring. For more information about the validation, please visit the Institution Validation website at https://district.ode.state.or.us/search/page/?id=246.

    However, changes to Institutions that will affect the Report Card can be submitted up to September 15 of the school year in which the change will take effect.
    Keywords: Report Card, institution , request , form , institution change, appendix A Appears in topics: Report Card, Institutions